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THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS OBTAINED FROM THE DOCTOR SEARCH SECTION OF THE WEBSITE OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS OF ONTARIO WWW.CPSO.ON.CA
Date: 11/08/22 22:35:41 PM

Al Abdulmohsin, Mohammed Abdullah H

CPSO#: 85297

MEMBER STATUS
Active Member as of 18 Mar 2018
CURRENT OR PAST CPSO REGISTRATION CLASS
Independent Practice as of 05 Jun 2018

Summary

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Former Name: No Former Name

Gender: Male

Languages Spoken: Arabic, English

Education: Arabian Gulf University College of Medic, 2003

Practice Information

Primary Location of Practice
Suite 318
2250 Bovaird Drive East
Brampton ON  L6R 0W3
Phone: (905) 458-4520
Fax: (905) 458-4080 Electoral District: 05

Medical Licences in Other Jurisdictions

Effective September 1, 2015, the College by-laws require the College to indicate on the register if the member has a licence or is registered to practise medicine in a jurisdiction outside Ontario, if this is known to the College.



USA - Pennsylvania

Hospital Privileges

Hospital Location
William Osler Health Centre Etobicoke General Site Toronto
William Osler Health Centre-Brampton Civic Hospital Brampton

Specialties

Specialty Issued On Type
General Surgery Effective:30 Jun 2012 RCPSC Specialist
Thoracic Surgery Effective:29 Sep 2014 RCPSC Specialist

Terms and Conditions

(1) Dr. MOHAMMED ABDULLAH H AL ABDULMOHSIN may practise only in the areas of medicine in which Dr. AL ABDULMOHSIN is educated and experienced.

Postgraduate Training

Please note: This information may not be a complete record of postgraduate training.



McMaster University, 01 Jul 2006 to 12 Sep 2006
PEAP - R - Cardiac Surgery

McMaster University, 13 Sep 2006 to 30 Jun 2007
PostGrad Yr 1 - Cardiac Surgery

McMaster University, 01 Jul 2007 to 19 Sep 2007
PostGrad Yr 1 - Cardiac Surgery

McMaster University, 20 Sep 2007 to 19 Sep 2008
PostGrad Yr 2 - Cardiac Surgery

McMaster University, 20 Sep 2008 to 30 Jun 2009
PostGrad Yr 3 - Cardiac Surgery

McMaster University, 01 Jul 2009 to 19 Sep 2009
PostGrad Yr 3 - Cardiac Surgery

McMaster University, 20 Sep 2009 to 30 Sep 2009
PostGrad Yr 4 - Cardiac Surgery

McMaster University, 01 Oct 2009 to 30 Jun 2010
PostGrad Yr 3 - General Surgery

McMaster University, 01 Jul 2010 to 30 Jun 2011
PostGrad Yr 4 - General Surgery

McMaster University, 01 Jul 2011 to 30 Jun 2012
PostGrad Yr 5 - General Surgery

McMaster University, 01 Jul 2012 to 30 Jun 2013
PostGrad Yr 6 - Thoracic Surgery

McMaster University, 01 Jul 2013 to 30 Jun 2014
PostGrad Yr 7 - Thoracic Surgery

McMaster University, 01 Jul 2014 to 25 Aug 2014
PostGrad Yr 7 - Thoracic Surgery

Registration History

Action Issue Date
First certificate of registration issued: Pre Entry Assessment Program Certificate Effective: 01 Jul 2006
Expired: Terms and conditions of certificate of registration Expiry: 12 Sep 2006
Subsequent certificate of registration Issued: Postgraduate Education Certificate Effective: 20 Sep 2006
Expired: Terms and conditions of certificate of registration Expiry: 18 Dec 2012
Subsequent certificate of registration Issued: Independent Practice Certificate Effective: 18 Dec 2012
Transfer of class of certificate to: Restricted certificate Effective: 18 Dec 2017
Terms and conditions imposed on certificate Effective: 18 Dec 2017
Transfer of class of certificate to: Restricted certificate Effective: 18 Dec 2017
Terms and conditions imposed on certificate Effective: 18 Dec 2017
Transfer of class of registration to: Independent Practice Certificate Effective: 05 Jun 2018

Previous Hearings

Committee: Discipline
Decision Date: 11 Oct 2017
Summary:

On October 7, 2017, the Discipline Committee found that Dr. Al Abdulmohsin committed an act of professional misconduct, in that he has engaged in conduct or an act or omission relevant to the practice of medicine that, having regard to all the circumstances, would reasonably be regarded by members as disgraceful, dishonourable or unprofessional.

Dr. Al Abdulmohsin is a general surgeon, who participated in a PGY 7 residency in thoracic
surgery at McMaster University, funded by the Saudi Bureau. Dr. Al Abdulmohsin is a graduate of the Arabian Gulf University in Bahrain. In 2012, he was granted an Independent Practice Certificate by the College.

OHIP Billings

In June 2014, the College received a mandatory report by McMaster University indicating that Dr. Al Abdulmohsin was suspended due to inappropriate OHIP Billing. The College was notified that Dr. Al Abdulmohsin billed OHIP for services he provided during his thoracic surgery residency, despite this not being permitted under the agreement between the Saudi Bureau and Revenue Canada.

Prior to this, Dr. Al Abdulmohsin approached the Division Head and the Program Director at McMaster University to ask whether he could submit OHIP billings to help supplement his income. He was advised that he was not permitted to do so, as this would be considered double billing, given that he was being paid by the Saudi Bureau for his training. It was explained to Dr. Al Abdulmohsin that he was being paid a salary to learn through his program, and as a result, he could not bill for procedures that he observed during his learning period.

In April 2014, the thoracic surgeons at Hamilton Healthcare and McMaster University discovered that despite being told he was not permitted to do so, Dr. Al Abdulmohsin, submitted clinical billings to OHIP for the purposes of personal payment. Dr. Al Abdulmohsin was placed on paid leave from the program for two months.

In May 2014, Dr. Al Abdulmohsin submitted a letter to the Assistant Dean at the University asserting that there was a misunderstanding as to what was communicated to him by the Division Head and the Program Director regarding his request to bill. Dr. Al Abdulmohsin stated in the letter that other than concerns raised by the post graduate office regarding income tax issues, no other concerns were expressed to him in response to his request to bill and there were no concerns regarding general propriety of his billing. Given that Dr. Al Adulmohsin was advised by the Division Head and the Program Director that he was not permitted to bill OHIP, the information he provided in his letter to the Assistant Dean in May 2014 was inaccurate.


In May 2014, Dr. Al Abdulmohsin voluntarily proposed that he be re-admitted to the thoracic surgery residency program conditional upon his repayment of the full amount billed to OHIP, completing McMaster University professionalism training sessions at his own cost, and issuing an apology to the staff and the program. Dr. Al Abdulmohsin completed these terms and was re- admitted to the thoracic surgery residency program in June, 2014.

The Committee found that Dr. Al Abdulmohsin engaged in conduct which would reasonably be regarded by members as disgraceful, dishonourable or unprofessional by inappropriately submitting OHIP clinical billings for payment for services he provided during his residency education program for personal gain, despite this not being permitted under the agreement between the Saudi Bureau and Revenue Canada and against the express advice of his Divisional Chief and Program Director.

Dealings with Nursing Staff at the Hospital

As part of the mandatory report by McMaster University in June 2014, the College was also notified about complaints from two nurses at the Hospital where Dr. Al Abdulmohsin completed his residency. The two nurses complained that Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s behaviour made them feel uncomfortable. The complaints were addressed by the Hospital in 2012 and the behaviour was not repeated.

The first nurse was a young, recent graduate, who was working at the Hospital in 2012. She testified that when she first met Dr. Al Abdulmohsin, he was very friendly. Over a few months he became more physical. He would lean forward slightly and begin conversing to the point where she would move away. That evolved within the first year or two to his placing his hands on the small of her back, close to the line of her scrub pants, while he was speaking with her. She estimated this happened at least 20 times. She described Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s placing of his hand at the small of nurses’ backs to be a frequent occurrence on the Unit, especially with newer younger staff. This behavior progressed to an event that caused her particular discomfort. She testified that one day, she was charting at the nursing station. Approximately nine or ten nursing colleagues were present in the same area. She asked Dr. Al Abdulmohsin a question; he approached her from behind and as he was speaking to her, he started to massage her shoulders, which she found uncomfortable. She responded by raising her shoulders to her ears and pushing the chair away and she told Dr. Al Abdulmohsin to stop. She told him that it made her very uncomfortable, and she asked him not to do it again. She testified that Dr. Al Abdulmohsin appeared embarrassed when she confronted him; he finished replying to her questions and then left the work space. After making a complaint via her charge nurse, she did not experience any further unwanted behaviour from him. She developed personal strategies by placing physical barriers to prevent further conversations in close proximity to him, and he did not advance further than that. As far as she was concerned, the issue had been resolved.

The second nurse was a young nurse working at the Hospital in 2012. She testified that she witnessed Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s behaviour of frequently massaging the shoulders of nurses and other staff, and she discussed the behaviour with fellow nursing staff. She testified that several times, she personally experienced Dr. Al Abdulmohsin rubbing or massaging her lower mid back. She also recalled one particular incident of Dr. Al Abdulmohsin caressing the upper part of her wrist with a circular gesture. She testified that she told Dr. Al Abdulmohsin at times to stop.

Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s conduct caused her to complain to her charge nurse.

The second nurse also testified that after she got engaged to be married, she was upset and hurt by an unsolicited comment from Dr. Al Abdulmohsin. He asked her why she would want to stay with someone for the rest of her life. She said that he didn’t express it as a joke, that he was very serious.

Four other nurses and the Division Head testified in relation to Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s behaviour.

One nurse indicated that she witnessed Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s behaviour of approaching the nursing staff from behind and rubbing their shoulders, but stated that she did not experience such behaviour toward herself. The other three nurses testified that they observed Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s tactile behaviour. All three nurses testified that they were not disturbed by it.

One nurse indicated that being tactile was part of his personality. Another nurse, who worked with him for several years, considered his behaviour appropriate in the workplace. The Division Head testified that when confronted with these complaints, Dr. Al Abdulmohsin was surprised, apologetic and embarrassed and responded that he would change his behaviour to accommodate the requests of the nurses. No further complaints regarding this type of Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s behaviour were received.

The Committee found that Dr. Al Abdulmohsin engaged in conduct which would reasonably be regarded by members as unprofessional by touching two nurses in an intimate an intrusive manner.

The Committee found that Dr. Al Abdulmohsin repeatedly touched the two nurses on the small of their backs, close to the line of their scrub pants, massaged the one nurse’s shoulders on one occasion, and caressed the other nurse’s wrist on one occasion. Massaging professional colleagues, touching them at their waistline, and caressing their wrists are intrusive acts and are of an intimate nature. These actions cross acceptable boundaries, and they constitute unprofessional conduct.

Boundaries in a physician’s workplace are important so as to provide an atmosphere of safety and respect for all health professionals working there. The intrusion by a member of the health care team into the physical space of another could precipitate many reactions, including fear and discomfort, and can have negative consequences for the overall collegiality of the workplace environment. In this case, Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s touching caused discomfort to two nurses to the extent that they complained; one of the nurses even took steps to avoid him touching her in the future.

It does not matter that only two individual nurses out of a larger group complained, or that other nurses found Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s tactile behaviour toward them to be acceptable. This does not change the fact that he crossed acceptable boundaries in his conduct toward the two nurses.

The fact that his inappropriate physical behaviour toward nurses stopped after it was brought to Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s attention does not detract from the finding that his conduct was unprofessional. A single event can constitute professional misconduct, and in this case there was more than one instance of unprofessional behaviour. Considering the context, and the at least seven years of experience that Dr. Al Abdulmohsin had as a surgical resident, he should have known better and should have been more sensitive to the effect of his actions.

The evidence indicated that Dr. Al Abdulmohsin was surprised, apologetic and embarrassed when he was told that his behaviour had caused harm and discomfort to his nursing colleagues.

Furthermore, as soon as the concern about his behaviour was brought to his attention, he stopped the behaviour and did not repeat it. Generally, conduct that is disgraceful or dishonourable carries an element of moral failure, whereas unprofessional conduct does not require dishonest or immoral elements. Therefore, while finding Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s conduct is unprofessional, the Committee was not satisfied that it was disgraceful or dishonourable.

The Committee found that that the allegation, of disgraceful, dishonourable or unprofessional conduct, was not proven in relation to Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s comment to the second nurse regarding staying with her husband. The Committee found that while the comment was inappropriate and was a further indication of Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s limited awareness of the effects of his actions on colleagues, it did not raise to the level of professional misconduct, because it was most likely made in a tactless, impulsive manner. It was inappropriate, but it was not disgraceful, dishonourable or unprofessional conduct.

Disposition

On December 18, 2017, the Committee ordered and directed that:

- the Registrar suspend Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s certificate of registration for three (3) months commencing December 18, 2017.
- the Registrar impose a term, condition, and limitation on Dr. Al Abdulmohsin’s certification of registration that at his own expense, Dr. Al Abdulmohsin shall participate in and successfully complete all aspects of the following programs, at the earliest opportunity:
Individualized instruction in professionalism/ethics satisfactory to the College, with an
instructor selected by the College; and
Understanding Boundaries in Managing the Risks Inherent in the Doctor- Patient
Relationship.
- Dr. Al Abdulmohsin appear before the panel to be reprimanded. 
- Dr. Al Abdulmohsin pay to the College its costs of this proceeding in the amount of $16,500.00 within thirty (30) days from the date of this Order.
 
 


Decision: Download Full Decision (PDF)
Hearing Date(s): April 7, May 11, 2017